War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0609 Chapter XXXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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I request that steps be taken to keep this command together and returned to this department by the first transport from New York City.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

W. H. EMORY,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS, June 30, 1863.

Major-General HALLECK,

Commander-in-Chief:

GENERAL: The enemy are in very considerable force on the west bank of the river, threatening General Banks' communication and this city.

On the 21st, we repulsed their advance guard at La Fourche, with great loss to the every, for the numbers engaged.

At Donaldsonville they attacked the red bout yesterday morning with 5,000 men. They were repulsed, with the loss of 100 left dead upon the field, 120 prisoners, including several officers of rank; the force on one side in fort consisting of only 150 men, but supported by three gunboats.

The enemy's object is evidently to raise the siege of Port Hudson by attacking New Orleans. I have, of cause, communicated everything to General Banks up to the time the telegraphic communication was cut, which was about 5 o'clock yesterday morning.

The land force in this city, and in the extensive liens of defenses contiguous to it, is less than a brigade. Should they succeed in cutting the communications of this army, I must look to the north for troops to defend this city, if they can be gotten here in time.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

W. H. EMORY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS OF BRIGADIER-GENERAL ULLMANN, New Orleans, June 30, 1863.

The ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. ARMY,

Washington, D. C.

SIR: I have the honor to report that all the forces under my command were ordered, as I have previously informed you, by Major-General Banks to Port Hudson. They have been employed there since the first days of June in digging. They have been of great service in this respect, the officers and men often passing twenty consecutive hours in the trenches. It has, however, entirely prevented my recruiting, excepting to a very limited degree. As soon as my officers can be relieved from this duty, I will proceed as rapidly as possible with the raising and organizing of my command.

I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servant,

DANIEL ULMANN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

39 R-VOL XXVI, PT I