War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0593 Chapter XXXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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If they really have 7,000 men coming down the bayou, Brashear is gone, and they will capture our trains there.

In that event it would be necessary to destroy the bridge at La Fourche Crossing, but if they have not that force, it would be an awful mistake to do so.

It is, however, a very small inconvenience to withdraw your forces to Boutte Station, even if the report is false.

W. H. EMORY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

June 24, 1863.

Colonel CAHILL:

Move at once your main force to Boutte. If you find you are deceived, you can move back again.

By command of Brigadier-General Emory:

[FRANK W. LORING,]

Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

June 24, 1863.

Lieutenant-Colonel IRWIN:

Saint Mary's has returned. Reports surprise and capture of Brashear City by forces which came across the lake. Nothing saved. The enemy in force are advancing down the La Fourche. Cahill is there with all his force, and has been ordered to fall back, but seems unable to do so.

You must no longer be incredulous.

W. H. EMORY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

BEFORE PORT HUDSON,

June 24, 1863.

Brigadier-General EMORY:

Your telegram just received. Can you not send the gunboat to Brashear City and prevent their crossing guns? Why is Cahill unable to fall back?

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

June 24, 1863.

Colonel CAHILL:

Do so, of course. Spike your guns, and retire your infantry by the railroad track, destroying the bridges as your rear guard passes them.

W. H. EMORY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

38 R-VOL XXVI, PT I