War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0592 W.FLA.,S.ALA.,S.MISS.,LA.,TEX.,N.MEX. Chapter XXXVIII.

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damage to the road is worse than reported, as I expected to hear from the bridge gang before this.

THOS. W. CAHILL,

Colonel, Commanding Second Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

June 24, 1863.

Colonel CAHILL:

I have sent General Banks' instructions to Brashear City not to risk too much to hold the place, but come off in the transports.

Those instructions cannot reach there in time to change the result, but the commanding officer of the party which is sent to relieve that place should know they have been sent.

There will be a telegraphic station put up at Boutte to-day. Had you not better retire your reserve to that point? You can hold the train there without risk. Let me know exactly your plans.

W. H. EMORY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

June 24, 1863.

Colonel CAHILL:

I retreat my suggestion of retiring your reserves to Boutte Station, and you will, as suggested in the previous telegram, hold your reserves for the present at La Fourche, and send forward a strong detachment, under the best officer you have, to attack the enemy in his rear at Brashear City.

Colonel Colburn goes down with a train of workmen to repair the bridge at Chucahoula. I will send a staff officer to Boutte Station to communicate any approach of the enemy that may be discovered by the cavalry up the river or on your flanks.

W. H. EMORY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

June 24, 1863.

Colonel CAHILL:

If the report of Major Morgan be true, it is your duty to retire to Boutte Station at once with all your force. Lose no time in the matter.

You might follow the track to Des Allemands, and telegraph the cars to meet you there.

W. H. EMORY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

June 24, 1863.

Colonel CAHILL:

If you believe the report to be true, you have no time to lose in getting away from where you are, leaving a strong guard and a light train at La Fourche.