War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0588 W.FLA.,S.ALA.,S.MISS.,LA.,TEX.,N.MEX. Chapter XXXVIII.

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HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

June 22, 1863.

Colonel CAHILL:

I have sent three companies of the Twenty-eighth Maine to Raceland, and all the cavalry to Boutte Station. You must judge of whether that is sufficient.

Unless you are strong enough to beat the enemy and reopen the communication to Brashear, there is not much use of being where you are, and you can fall back to Boutte Station, leaving your advanced guard at Des Allemands.

The whole matter must be left to your judgment, based upon a knowledge of the facts on the ground.

Unless you can reopen to Brashear, the only advantage gained by your present position is that you check the enemy in his attack on Brashear, and enable the gunboats to get there and prevent the enemy from escaping.

W. H. EMORY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

LA FOURCHE,

June 22, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel W. D. SMITH,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

Your telegram is just received. The men are in good spirits. The enemy are taking their dead under a flag of truce. I do not think I can compel the enemy to concentrate enough, so that I may act with effect against them with artillery or infantry. The front and right of our position is too open. It is open to the Brashear road, 4 miles in our front. What is to hinder them from striking the river by that road and cutting off our communication? The levee on the other side of the bayou can be made use of the enfilade our lines, as also can the railroad embankment. If they have artillery, they can shell us out of our position. The loss to the enemy last night was in consequence of their attacking us in the levee and railroad embankment, each being 16 feet high. We had also a slight intrenchment on one third of our front. We have no means of protecting the line of railroad on our right for 4 miles to the swamp and to Des Allemands.

Colonel Stickney goes to the city to report in person this afternoon.

THOS. W. CAHILL,

Colonel, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

June 22, 1863.

Colonel CAHILL:

Why should Colonel Stickney leave his command at this time?

I must necessarily leave the question of remaining where you are or falling back to your own judgment, based upon a knowledge of the facts as you have them upon the ground.

If you cannot hold the place and keep open your communication, fall back.

W. H. EMORY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.