War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0581 Chapter XXXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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The enemy are between La Fourche and Brashear. Have cut the communication at Terre Bonne. The force at La Fourche is ordered, if possible, to restore the communication. Can't say the number of rations they have at Brashear City, but enemy can't subdue them while those rations last. I fear, however, that nothing can effectually relieve them but a strong force landed at Donaldsonville, and marching on the enemy's rear.

The enemy now threaten Des Allemands; in consequence, Colonel Cahill has stopped a smart force there.

W. H. EMORY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

June 21, 1863.

Lieutenant-Colonel STICKNEY:

In regard to whether you will attack the enemy and attempt to relieve Brashear City, or to fall back to Des Allemands, you must use your own discretion.

That must be decided on the ground, where you can judge the force of the enemy. Whatever you decide, telegraph me, and communicate with Colonel Cahill, at Boutte Station. Watch your trains, that none of them fall into the hands of the enemy.

W. H. EMORY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

June 21, 1863.

Commanding Officer at Brashear City:

SIR: The communication being cut at Terre Bonne by the enemy, I send round to you by sea, to direct you to hold on till the last extremity, and to say to you that I will communicate to you regularly be sea. Send me a full report of your condition and wants, if any. Any sick or wounded you may have, you can send round by the Saint Mary's, but you will give her immediate dispatch.

By command of W. H. Emory, brigadier-general, commanding:

D. SMITH,

Adjutant-General.

Lieutenant Colonel, and Acting A

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

June 21, 1863.

Lieutenant-Colonel IRWIN:

The guns are at Brashear City; also a large number of sick, rolling stock of the railroad, and a special train, which took off two companies.

I ordered Stickney, after repelling the attack at La Fourche, to go back to Brashear with the largest part of his force, but the enemy is so strong this would be only to isolate and probably lose his force.

Without aid from you, the force here cannot reoccupy Brashear. Therefore, the defense of this long line of road is impracticable, and should, in my opinion, be abandoned, and what we have left be with-