War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0571 Chapter XXXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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About 100 of the Texas cavalry made a raid upon Plaquemine, and burned the steamers that were there, and captured some of the provost pickets, but they lost some of their number, and were shelled by the gunboat Winona, which arrived there two or three hours after they attacked the town. They also burned about 40 bales of cotton. I found your ammunition on board the Time and Tide, waiting for convoy, and sent her forward under protection of the Winona.

I also received some mortar shell for the mortar-boats, which will help us very much. I hope to be back in time to see Port Hudson fall.

The rebel papers say that Grant has Pemberton in a circumference of 1,200 yards, but that Johnston is coming in his rear with 70,000 men, and Kirby Smith is with a force at Milliken's Bend. This last is not credited by our side.

We saved 15 out of 21 of the provost picket at Plaquemine, and may recover more of them.

Major Bullen feels no uneasiness about Donaldsonville so long as he has a gunboat, which I shall leave.

Wishing you early success, I remain, very truly,

D. G. FARRAGUT,

Rear-Admiral.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE GULF, NINETEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Before Port Hudson, June 19, 1863.

Brigadier General W. H. EMORY, New Orleans:

GENERAL: A few days ago there were 300 cavalry hovering around Colonel Sage at Fausse Point. They went toward Plaquemine. To-day a quartermaster's clerk, taken prisoner at Plaquemine, says the enemy's force at that place was two regiments of cavalry, one of infantry, and six pieces of artillery. The reports began with 500, and have reached 5,000, but the lower number is probably the nearest to the truth. Donaldsonville is in no danger. The admiral has gone down with a gunboat. Make the transports come up. The fears of steamboat men and provost-marshals will do more than the enemy can to interrupt the communications of this army.

By command of Major-General Banks:

RICH'D B. IRWIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

June 19, 1863.

Lieutenant-Colonel IRWIN:

The gunboat Princess Royal has just arrived at Southwest Pass from Philadelphia, and Commodore Morris has kindly consented to let her go up the river to aid in repelling the enemy at Plaquemine and opening the navigation.

W. H. EMORY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

June 19, 1863.

Commodore MORRIS:

I have just learned that Admiral Farragut is on his way down, and may be expected either to-night or to-morrow morning. The informa-