War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0543 Chapter XXXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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driving the enemy away from the parapet. Our fire was, except in one or two instances, unanswered. The heavy guns were admirably served. Please keep up your mortar fire during the whole of this night. We shall fire slowly all night. Will send you a report of the operations at the mouth of Thompson's Creek this evening.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

BEFORE PORT HUDSON,

June 9, 1863.

Brigadier General W. H. EMORY,

New Orleans:

GENERAL: Your three telegrams received. Send guns and ammunition to Brashear City. Your instructions as to steamboat Sykes, Segur, and Souther Merchant are approved. Shall send down some troops on Thursday. The gunboat should be sent to Brasher, as you propose.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

June 9, 1873.

Commodore [HENRY W.] MORRIS:

I have just learned that Brashear City is threatened by a formidable force. Have you a gunboat you can send around there? If so, oblige me by sending it off with all possible dispatch. With the aid of a gunboat, I do not doubt the place can be held. There are so many sick, it cannot be abandoned without time and loss.

I have the honor, sir, to be, your obedient servant,

W. H. EMORY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

June 9, 1863.

Lieutenant-Colonel IRWIN:

A telegram this moment received from Colonel Stickney will be transmitted as soon as possible. Notwithstanding his telegram of the day before yesterday that he did not consider the place in danger, he how telegraphs me that he is to be attacked, and express great apprehensions for the safety of the place. Captain Shunk tells me neither the guns nor the ammunition which were ordered to be sent yesterday are here to send. I shall send him the re-enforcements and the field pieces which he asks for in to-day's dispatch.

The commanding general himself can judge whether he can spare any force from above to defend this post.

W. H. EMORY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.