War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0521 Chapter XXXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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had to drop down half a mile. Lieutenant Harcourt informs me that a gunboat cannot get into Thompson's Creek, nor can the Hartford shell the batteries without great exposure and risk of getting on shore. Mr. Harcourt will show us the signal station in the morning, as well as the other points.

I have written to Porter for some hand-grenades, as I understand he has plenty in his fleet.

Very truly, yours,

D. G. FARRAGUT,

Rear-Admiral.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE GULF, NINETEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Before Port Hudson, May 29, 1863.

Admiral D. G. FARRAGUT;

DEAR SIR: We have a battery of four Dahlgren guns, for which I am providing platforms. I should be glad if your could detail, without detriment to your service, a sufficient number of marines to strongly man these guns with expert men. It will render us material service. Everything looks well for us. The rebels attempted a sortie upon our right last evening upon the cessation of the armistice, but were smartly and quickly repulsed. You must have heard the firing; but 4 of men were wounded.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE GULF, NINETEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Before Port Hudson, May 29, 1863-10 p. m.

Rear-Admiral D. G. FARRAGUT, U. S. Navy,

Commanding, &c., Flag-ship Monongahela:

ADMIRAL: Our general position is unchanged to-day. The enemy took advantage of the armistice yesterday to move the commissary stores from the store-house on our right, which was under our fire, and to mass new guns against us in that quarter. He is evidently very tender there. I wish you would continue to harass him; at night especially. We will keep him attentive during the day and occasionally at night also.

We are endeavoring to complete the telegraph line to Springfield Landing, and hope by to-morrow night to be in immediate communication with you by telegraph and signals. We can then inform you from time to time of the effect of your fire and measurably direct it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE GULF, NINETEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Before Port Hudson, May 29, 1863-9 a. m.

Colonel L. BENEDICT,

Commanding U. S. Forces opposite Port Hudson:

COLONEL: I am directed by the commanding general to acknowledge the receipt of your dispatch of yesterday. The commanding general approves your dispositions. It is not credited here that Kirby Smith