War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0518 W. FLA., S. ALA., S. MISS., LA., TEX., N. MEX. Chapter XXXVIII.

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION,

In the Field, near Port Hudson, May 28, 1863.

Colonel RICHARD B. IRWIN,

Asst. Adjt. General, Headquarters Department of the Gulf:

COLONEL: I have been informed this morning by a member of General Banks's staff that, pending the negotiations for cessation of hostilities, all firing on our part should cease. I have given orders to this effect. The enemy, however, are at work repairing damages sustained yesterday on their works in our front. Otherwise all is quiet.

Please inform me at the earliest moment of the conditions in relation to the truce; also any other matters to enable me to act more understandingly.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. S. NICKERSON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Second Division.

CIRCULAR.] HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE GULF, 19TH ARMY CORPS,

Before Port Hudson, May 28, 1863-3.30 p. m.

A suspension of hostilities until 7 p. m. is just agreed on.

The conditions are:

1. Total suspension of hostilities.

2. We are to send the enemy's killed, who have not been buried, and his wounded not picket up and sent to the rear, to the enemy's lines, by unarmed parties.

3. We are to send unarmed parties to pick up our own killed and wounded before the works.

4. Our skirmishers are not to advance during the armistice.

These conditions will be strictly observed.

By command of Major-General Banks:

RICH'D B. IRWIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

U. S. FLAG-SHIP MONONGAHELA,

May 28, 1863.

Major General N. P. BANKS:

DEAR GENERAL: I deeply sympathize with you in your losses and failures to carry the works of the enemy. I know nothing of the arrangements of their works, and consequently have no judgment in the case. When I saw General Weitzel open his batteries on the extreme right, I thought we were all right; but when the forts silenced his fire, I feared again that all was lost, and that he had retired.

In their exultation this morning, they opened upon us; we returned their fire, and continued to shell them until next move in the case, so as to know how to co-operate with you.

I sent General Sherman and some of the wounded down to New Orleans last night in our tug, and have this morning sent three medical officers down to Springfield Landing to assist your surgeons, and I only desire to know in what other way I may assist you.

When you have made up your mind as to your next move, please let me know, that I may govern myself accordingly.

In the meantime, I remain, very sincerely, yours,

D. G. FARRAGUT,

Rear -Admiral.