War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0447 Chapter XXXVIII. THE RIO GRANDE EXPEDITION, ETC.

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Colonel Bradfute directs that, if you are on shipboard with your command, you will proceed directly to Port Lavaca, or, if necessary for its safety, you will come to that point with as little delay as possible, in accordance with instructions you have previously received from the major-general commanding.

Captain Chesley, the bearer of this, will acquaint you with the causes of the evacuation. Be kind enough to report this disaster to General Magruder by earliest courier.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. J. LEE,

Major, and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S.-Colonel Bradfute will make a stand at Lavaca.

Numbers 15. Report of Major John Ireland, Eighth Texas Infantry, of operations November 23.

FORT ESPERANZA,

November 23, 1863.

COLONEL: Captain Barden has just arrived. He left Cedar Bayou at 12 m. to-day, where he met the enemy, about 60 cavalry, about 300 infantry, and two pieces of artillery.

Major Hill was killed, and when Captain Barden left, the enemy were on this side of the bayou. He reports seventeen sail at Aransas. It appears from this that the enemy are advancing on this point.

This force is, I suppose, their advance guard. We want more men of every sort, and especially cavalry.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. IRELAND,

Major, Commanding, &c.

Colonel W. R. BRADFUTE,

Commanding Coast.

OCTOBER 28, 1863.-Mutiny of Vidal.

Reports of Brigadier General H. P. Bee, C. S. Army, commanding First Division, Army of Texas.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, ARMY OF TEXAS,

Fort Brown, Tex., October 28, 1863.

The Commanding Officer, Ringgold Barracks:

SIR: I am directed by the brigadier-general commanding to inform you that the company of Captain A. I. Vidal, led by him in person, have proved themselves base traitors, and have rebelled against the military and civil authorities of our country, and, after murdering several inoffensive citizens and 2 of their comrades, have passed up the river, forcing the rancheros on the roads into their ranks, and have raised once more the standard of the traitor Cortinas.

Under these circumstances, the brigadier-general commanding directs that you use your utmost endeavor to arrest their further progress, and, if possible, to capture them. Their numbers are supposed to be at pres-