War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0431 Chapter XXXVIII. THE RIO GRANDE EXPEDITION, ETC.

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RETURN OF FOURTH DIVISION.

During the month of December, the division marched from New Iberia, La., to Brashear City, where it took cars, and was transported to Algiers, from which place it was transported in vessels to this [De Cros'] Point, arriving January 2, 1864.

RETURN OF FIRST BRIGADE, FOURTH DIVISION.

December 7.-This command was ordered to break camp by Major-General Franklin, and march to Berwick City, La.

December 10.-The command arrived at Berwick City.

December 11.-Was ordered by General Banks to report to Algiers, La.

December 12.-Arrived at Algiers.

December 16.-The Sixtieth and Sixty-seventh Indiana Regiments of this command embarked on the steamer Demale, and arrived on the 20th instant.

December 18.-The Nineteenth Kentucky, and the Ninety-sixth Ohio embarked on the steamer George Peabody, and arrived here [De Cros'] the 21st instant.

RETURN OF THE SECOND BRIGADE, FOURTH DIVISION.

December 7.-The brigade left New Iberia, and marched, via Franklin, to Berwick, La., where we encamped December 10.

December 11.-Proceeded by rail to Algiers, La., leaving one regiment (Seventy-seventh Illinois Volunteers) at Berwick, La.

December 13.-Embarked on the steam-transports Continental for Port Cavallo, Tex. Disembarked, and encamped at Decros' Point, Tex., 18th instant.

December 21.-The Seventy-seventh Illinois rejoined the brigade.

Numbers 9. Reports of Major General John B. Magruder, C. S. Army, commanding District of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona.

HDQRS. DIST. OF TEXAS, NEW MEXICO, AND ARIZONA,

Houston, Tex., November 21, 1863.

GENERAL: I have the honor to transmit, for the information of the lieutenant-general commanding, copies of letters from Colonel Bradfute, announcing the capture of Aransas and Corpus Christi Passes, and from General Bee, relative to the plans of the enemy.

The orders of Lieutenant-General Smith to relieve the Confederate troops on the coast by State troops were being executed when the intelligence of the fall of Brownsville and the two passes arrived. It required much time to effect the change, as the State troops had to march a long distance, they having been massed, according to General Smith's previous orders, at points above the railroads, with the view of marching to Cotile. Nevertheless, I hope to be able to get troops west in time to save, if not Saluria, at least Velasco, at the mouth of the Brazos. It