War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0406 W. FLA., S. ALA., S. MISS., LA., TEX., N. MEX. Chapter XXXVIII.

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General Dana arrived at Brownsville last evening. I shall remain here until our affairs are in a settled condition.

I repeat my representations to the Government, that a small force of effective men, in addition to the strength I have, will be of incalculable service in the restoration of Texas, which I think can be accomplished in a very brief period. Volunteers in New England and in the West, I am certain, could be readily obtained if the Government would authorize it. Five or ten thousand men is all that I will ask.

Our success, thus far, has exceeded my most sanguine expectations. The people on both sides the river are friendly to the Government, and if affairs are managed with any discretion, the cause of the Government will be greatly strengthened throughout the whole Southwest.

The Fifteenth Maine Volunteers is at Brazos; the Twentieth Wisconsin at Point Isabel. Two regiments of the Corps d'Afrique, the First and Sixteenth, occupy Brazos Island. The balance of the force connected with the expedition is en route for this point.

I have the honor to be, with much respect, your obedient servant,

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

Brownsville, Tex., November 9, 1863.

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose copies of the proclamations issued this day (November 9). The signatures to the "acta" represent, as far as I can understand, the permanent officers of the military organization.

Governor Serna, it is supposed, will be heard from within two days, and it is believed that the prominent men of both parties will acquiesce, in his government. However, everything is yet unsettled as to the future.

With much respect, your obedient servant,

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

MATAMORAS,

November 8, 1863.

To the Public:

The subscribers, feeling himself obliged to explain promptly to the nation, as well as the people of this heroic city and the armed garrison which he has the honor to command, the reason for the execution done at 8 o'clock yesterday morning on the person of Don Jose M. Cobos, and as neither time nor the demands of the service to which he is pre-eminently dedicated in order to maintain tranquility and order among the people will permit him to make an elaborate explanation of what has taken place, he will merely say that the garrison agreed to proclaim the raising of the siege in Tamaulipas, thereby re-establishing constitutional order, as the situation was no longer endurable in the State, for reasons which he proposes to explain to the Supreme Government of the nation. Cobos assented to this idea, and, under its protection,