War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0405 Chapter XXXVIII. THE RIO GRANDE EXPEDITION, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

may be made a point of attack; judging from the appearance of the Frenchmen. However, Captain Bennett can better explain everything as I have been very busy all day.

He brings two gentlemen with him; one, Signor Chapa, is one of our most eminent men, and very wealthy, and goes over for refuge.

Very respectfully, &c.,

L. PIERCE, JR.,

United States Consul.

[Inclosure Numbers 4.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

Brownsville, Tex., November 7, 1863-5.30 p.m.

L. PIERCE, Jr.,

American Consul at Matamoras:

SIR: Your note of this date, expressing an apprehension of an attack upon the American consulate in Matamoras, is this moment received. If the American flag is assailed or your person threatened in the progress of such riot as you anticipate, and the authorities fail to protect you, you may rely upon protection, if notice is given to me. My artillery is placed in position where it will be effective.

I cannot believe the apprehension you express will be verified, but desire information of the fact if there be any substantial ground of apprehension of such an event.

I have the honor to be, &c.,

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

Brownsville, Tex., November 9, 1863.

SIR: I am in occupation of Braxos Island, Point Isabel, and Brownsville. My most sanguine expectations are more than realized. Three revolutions have occurred in Matamoras, affecting the government of Tamaulipas. The first adverse to the interests of Mexico and the United States. Everything is now as favorable as could be desired.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

The PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

Brownsville, Tex., November 9, 1863.

GENERAL; But little is to be added to the dispatches of the 6th and 7th instant. Affairs are quiet in Matamoras. Governor Ruiz is in Brownsville, Cortinas in power, and messengers have been dispatched for Governor Serna, who resides 200 miles distant. The friendship of the Cortinas party for the American Government has been signally manifested by his placing three Rio Grande steamers on this side of the river under our control. One of these, the Matamoras, is the only boat that can cross the bar.