War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0349 Chapter XXXVIII. OPERATIONS IN THE TECHE COUNTRY, LA.

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This morning I have sent out to Vermillion Bayou. I think it would take Magruder two weeks, or perhaps longer, to march 20,000 men from Niblett's bluff to Vermillion. There are two long bridges to build, perhaps three.

I will let you know as soon as I hear anything from the front. I have sent large force.

W. B. FRANKLIN,

Major-General, Commanding.

Brigadier-General STONE,

Chief of Staff, New Orleans, La.

HEADQUARTERS TROOPS IN THE FIELD,

New Iberia, November 25, 1863.

I have just has a report from General Lee, who commanded the cavalry reconnaissance this morning. He has driven the enemy across Vermillion Bayou, the Fourth Texas [Cavalry] and Second Louisiana [Cavalry], taking 4 officers and 68 men. He burned the bridge. Major's brigade was there. He heard nothing of Magruder. My headquarters guard has also taken 11 guerrillas to-day.

W. B. FRANKLIN,

Major-General, Commanding.

Brigadier General CHARLES P. STONE,

Chief of Staff, New Orleans, La.

HEADQUARTERS TROOPS IN THE FIELD,

November 25, 1863-7.15 p. m.

The regiments at Vermillion are, Fourth, Fifth, and Seventh Texas [Cavalry], Hardeman's, Green's, and Bagby's, forming Bagby's brigade; Stone's, Phillips', Baylor's, W. G. Vincent's, and one other, whose colonel's name begins with B, but whose name I cannot make out, forming Major's brigade. This is all the force at Vermillion. The prisoners say that they understand that Magruder is at the Mermenton, but they are not well posted, and speak from rumor, or else they have been stuffed. The cavalry to-day made a saber charge, killed 7 or 8 of the enemy, wounded sundry others, and had no loss on our side.

I mistook General Lee's dispatch; the brigade was not burned. He pursued them to the bridge.

W. B. FRANKLIN,

Major-General.

Brigadier General CHARLES P. STONE,

Chief of Staff, New Orleans, La.

HEADQUARTERS TROOPS IN THE FIELD,

November 25, 1863-9.30 p. m.

Have received your dispatch of 9 p. m. I shall keep a sharp lookout for Magruder. Can hold this position against a largely superior force, but cannot vouch for my communications. Had intended to go back to Olivier's if I were sure that such force were coming. There, could hold on for a long time against anything, but the trouble will be more from want of forage than from the enemy. There is a ditch in front of