War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0348 W. FLA.,S. ALA.,S. MISS.,LA.,TEX.,N. MEX. Chapter XXXVIII.

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forces are superior to ours and he certain of success. He has it in his power to hover on all sides of an infantry force, producing an annoyance the severity of which cannot be appreciated unless it be felt.

The only way of meeting this method of warfare is to keep a large force mounted. This force should be the main body of the army, and the infantry should be subordinate to it. In fact, I doubt whether any infantry be necessary at all. The artillery should be horse artillery, and there should be a liberal allowance of it, say three batteries.

All of the infantry should be mounted whose unexpired terms of service will justify the labor of teaching them to be cavalry, and about one-half should be mounted infantry, the remainder cavalry.

Such towns as are to be held should have works thrown up which will command them. These works should be provisioned and watered, so as to be independent of the country outside, and should be able to stand a short siege, and be protected against a coup de main. They should be held by strong garrisons, with good artillery. The question as to whether the animals belonging to the mounted force which I have indicated can be fed in the country is a grave one. But it belongs to the subject of holding the country at all. I do not think that the enemy can be perfectly driven from this country until some course like that here suggested be adopted.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. B. FRANKLIN,

Major-General, Commanding.

Brigadier General CHARLES P. STONE,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS TROOPS IN THE FIELD,

New Iberia, November 24, 1863.

Night before last the cavalry surprised a rebel camp near Bayou Portage, captured 3 officers, 30 men, 1 flag, and killed 2 men. The camp was entirely broken up. Some horses and mules were taken. There has been nothing new since then. Would have informed you before, but telegraphic communication has continually been broken by hostile parties in our rear.

W. B. FRANKLIN,

Major-General, Commanding.

Brigadier General CHARLES P. STONE,

Chief of Staff, New Orleans, La.

P. S.-Have written you by to-day's boat.

HEADQUARTERS TROOPS IN THE FIELD,

November 25, 1863-9.15 a. m.

Have received your dispatches relative to movements of the enemy. Some of the prisoners asked us if we had taken any of Magruder's men yet, from which I infer that they thought he was on his way here, but I have had no other indication that he has been expected at Vermillion. No troops have passed through Saint Martinsville. They may, however, have crossed the Teche higher up. One of the prisoners spoke of Mouton being on Bayou Grele, east of the Atchafalaya, but I thought that was the movement toward mouth of Red River.