War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0175 Chapter XXXVIII. SIEGE OF PORT HUDSON, LA.

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then moved toward the woods on his left, where, being joined by additional forces, he attempted to carry the advanced work near the Troth road. He was allowed to pass one regiment unmolested down the hill into the ravine at the base of the work. Thinking no opposition was meant, perhaps, he started a second regiment down the same road, which was also allowed to make its march unmolested abut half-way down the hill, when, at the same moment, the advancing regiment was opened upon by a section of [R. M.] Boone's battery and the stationary one by the infantry. Stupefied and bewildered, these regiments scarcely attempted to reply, but broke in confusion, and in disorder hurried from the conflict. Though his infantry amounted to many regiments, these two were all that came within the range of our pieces.

The casualties of the day are 4 killed and 11 wounded.

Failing in his general attack of the morning, the enemy had distributed a large number of sharpshooters all along the line, who, throughout the day, have been unwearying in their work. I regret to add that Lieutenant [B. W.] Clark, of my staff, discovered last night a considerable space of the breastwork next to my left not only without men to resist an attack, but even without a guard or picket. I sent one company to guard the work during the night.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. R. MILES,

Colonel, &c.

Major T. F. WILLSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ON THE FIELD,

June 15, 1863.

The fleet shelled us last night. The land batteries have fired on us at intervals throughout the day, and the sharpshooters have been more than ordinarily energetic, productive of no casualty, however. Opposite my extreme right, the enemy is busily engaged in throwing up a new chain of rifle-pits, which we are unable to prevent.

I am, major very, respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. R. MILES,

Colonel, &c.

Major T. F. WILLSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ON THE FIELD,

June 16, 1863.

The fleet last night shelled us at it accustomed time and in about the usual quantity. The batteries to-day have been active, but not extremely vigorous. The sharpshooters, particularly on the extreme right, have displayed more energy and perseverance than on any day heretofore. The casualties of the day are 1 killed and 3 wounded. No evidence of any extraordinary demonstration by the enemy.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. R. MILES,

Colonel, &c.

Major T. F. WILLSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.