War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0174 W. FLA., S. ALA., S. MISS., LA., TEX., N. MEX. Chapter XXXVIII.

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their fire has slackened considerably-I would fain hope tapering to its final end.

Neither of the 24-pounder guns are yet mounted on my lines, and if no more attention shall be given in directing the labor of the large nightly details I am called on to furnish than has been bestowed heretofore, it is a mere matter of conjecture when they will be put in position.

No casualties reported during the day. The 30-pounder Parrott gun at the extreme right has been dismounted to-day by the enemy's land batteries.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. R. MILES,

Colonel, &c.

Major T. F. WILLSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ON THE FIELD,

June 13, 1863.

Very nearly this morning we were quite severely cannonaded. Later on in the forenoon the most tremendous affair of the siege came off. From the fleet in the river and from every gun in position on shore came the quick flash and angry roar of threatening annihilation. The air grew thick with smoke and hoarse with sound. After some hours spent in this manner, it became apparent the enemy was making preparations for a charge. General Beall's line being most threatened, I sent one battalion to his support, keeping the balance of my force in position to repel an attack should one be made on my own line, or move to the further support of General Beall. No attack was made on me; and, after trying several times to bring their lines to the assault, the enemy beat a hasty retreat. Nothing but a few of his sharpshooters approached the breastworks, and the neighborhood soon grew too hot for them. How many of them were killed and wounded I do not know. Of the battalion sent by me to General Beall's support, 2 men were severely wounded. Besides these, I have lost on my lines to-day 1 man killed and 1 wounded. Yesterday, on the extreme right, where Lieutenant-Colonel [Fred. B.] Brand commands, there were of the pickets 1 man killed. 1 wounded, and 5 captured.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. R. MILES,

Colonel, &c.

Major T. F. WILLSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ON THE FIELD,

June 14, 1863.

About 4 a. m. the enemy opened a terrible fire from all his guns along the line, from the extreme right to the extreme left. It was kept up till 8 o'clock, varying in intensity, but always severe. At an early hour I could distinguish the rattle of small-arms toward the left, and for a time thought no demonstration was intended against my position, but was soon undeceived. In regular line of battle, the enemy attempted an advance through the open field upon my left. A few shots from the artillery and a few rounds from the infantry caused him to fall back. He