War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0172 W. FLA., S. ALA., S. MISS., LA., TEX., N. MEX. Chapter XXXVIII.

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The batteries near Hunt's house and the mouth of Troth's lane, that were removed yesterday evening have not yet reappeared. No artillery visible in front of my lines.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. R. MILES,

Colonel, &c.

Major T. F. WILLSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ON THE FIELD,

June 8, 1863.

Late yesterday evening, after writing my report, I had 1 man killed by the enemy's sharpshooters. Between 1 and 2 o'clock this morning, the enemy in force made an advance on my left and center. He was handsomely repulsed, and did not renew the attack. During the night, two pieces of artillery were placed in position near Hunt's house, and have saluted us several times since. My scouts, sent out in the woods between the Troth road and the river, report a strong force of the enemy there, and say they are engaged in digging rifle-pits and throwing up earthworks. Should you desire to send any one outside the lines for information, the two young men who acted for me, I think, would successfully accomplish the mission. The fleet shelled us, as usual, during the night.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. R. MILES,

Colonel, &c.

Major T. F. WILLSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ON THE FIELD,

June 9, 1863.

The enemy has brought back his Parrott and Whitworth guns to my front, and, in addition, has planted two light 8-inch mortars and one 8-inch gun, with all of which he has been delivering an energetic fire since about 11 o'clock this morning, wounding 1 man severely. It seems a miracle that we have escaped thus, for the 8-inch gun has an enfilading fire along several hundred yards of my left.

This gun is placed in the point of woods between Hunt's and Slaughter's, and is beyond the range of my small pieces. I sent word to that effect to Brigadier-General Beall, and requested him to order some of his guns opposite to open on it, in the hope of either silencing it or deranging its fire. For some good reason, doubtless, nothing of the sort has been done.

I beg leave respectfully to suggest that it is of very great importance to pay some attention to this big gun, as it is by all means the ugliest acquaintance we have yet made. The shelling by the fleet last night was not very severe.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. R. MILES,

Colonel, &c.

Major T. F. WILLSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.