War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0171 Chapter XXXVIII. SIEGE OF PORT HUDSON, LA.

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ON THE FIELD;

June 3, 1863.

Just after writing my report of yesterday, 2 men of the legion were wounded here by the enemy's sharpshooters. I have learned that the detachment of the legion holding Colonel Steedman's position has had 1 man killed to-day and 5 wounded.

The fleet last night shelled us slowly, without inflicting any injury; and the batteries, though playing on us all day, have not injured a man or affected the works. The enemy is at work in front of the outer works in Gibbon's field. It is impossible to tell precisely what he is doing; most probably digging rifle-pits and preparing a place for his artillery.

I am, major, very respectfully, &c.,

W. R. MILES,

Colonel, &c.

Major T. F. WILLSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ON THE FIELD,

June 6, 1863.

The batteries and fleet for some two hours this forenoon grave us a very heavy fire. The battery heretofore stationed at the mouth of Troth's lane moved off this evening in the direction of the river below; and the battery near Hunt's house, with eight wagon-loads of stores, moved off also but the same hour and in the same direction. Unless these movements are a ruse, it is evident the enemy is moving off a large portion, if not all, of his forces. I have no casualties to report for the day.

I am, major, very respectfully, &c.,

W. R. MILES,

Colonel, &c.

Major T. F. WILLSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ON THE FIELD,

June 7, 1863.

Early this morning a large body of infantry marched from the river at Troth's through the lane out toward the works. [R. M.] Bonne's battery fired several shots at the column as it passed, and a number of them were seen to fall. They double-quicked out of range, and got, under cover.

During the day the enemy has been discovered working steadily in the edge of the woods nearly midway between where his batteries that were taken off yesterday evening were formerly posted. It looks as if he is preparing a place for a large battery. Late this evening several companies of troops have been seen passing from the woods toward Troth's. They were fired upon by Lieutenant [H. W.] Coleman, and made to pass by in haste and some confusion. I will send out a scout between midnight and day to examine the woods between my right and Troth's for the purpose of learning the enemy's numbers there, and what he is doing.

The fleet shelled us last night, and a battery back of Salughter's late residence, in front of General Beall's lines, has been firing on us through the day. No casualty.