War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0169 Chapter XXXVIII. SIEGE OF PORT HUDSON, LA.

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force, and both times were driven back hurriedly, the latter time in great confusion and in full run.

A short time after the second repulse, a flag of truce was observed near the place from which the enemy was driven. I sent Captain [R. M.] Hewitt and Lieutenant [B. W.] Clark to meet it. Before they reached the ground, the flag moved off. They could plainly see litters, bearing off either wounded or dead. It occurs to me that this is plain violation of the white flag. I dared not fire upon it, and yet it may have been made use of to carry off wounded who otherwise would have become our prisoners. If it can be used for one illicit purpose it may be fore another, and its sanctity will be destroyed; I therefore beg leave to call Major-General Gardner's attention to it.

I am, major, very respectfully,

W. R. MILES,

Colonel, Commanding, &c.

Major T. F. WILLSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ON THE FIELD,

May 27, 1863.

About half an hour by sun this morning the enemy opened an infernal fire on our lines. With occasional lulls, the cannonade continued until about 2 p. m., when I learned the enemy had formed in line of battle, and was advancing on General Beall's center and left. Without waiting for official notification, I at once pushed forward to his support every man I could spare. My men had barely got their position when the enemy opened fire, advancing with infantry and artillery. He was repulsed three several times, and has now retired. Ia m holding the field, General Beall's forces having gone to the left. What the enemy's loss is it is impossible to say. Subordinate commanders not having handed in their reports, it is impossible to give an accurate list of casualties. I will supply the omission hereafter.

Respectfully, &c.,

W. R. MILES,

Colonel, &c.

Major T. F. WILLSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ON THE FIELD,

May 28, 1863.

The enemy opened his accustomed cannonade at an early hour this morning, the mortar fleet and gunboats below chiming in, and for some time shell and solid shot fell thick along the line. Between 10 and 11 o'clock I received notice that Major-General Banks had asked for a truce, to allow him the opportunity to bury his dead and care for his wounded, who covered the ground where the fights occurred yesterday. The various precautionary orders connected therewith were received, promptly communicated, and vigilantly enforced. I observed no disposition on the part of the enemy to violate the truce during the day. Ten prisoners were taken by my men and sent to headquarters this morning.

Lieutenant [W. W.] Carlos, thought to have been mortally wounded yesterday evening, is improving, and will, I think, recover. The