War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0153 Chapter XXXVIII. SIEGE OF PORT HUDSON, LA.

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HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING, HEAVY BATTERIES,

Port Hudson, May 24, 1863.

MAJOR: I have to report the following casualties among the men of my command armed as infantry, and stationed at the breastworks on the extreme right: Killed, Corporal [William] Zengle and Private [Adolph] Hidman, of Company A, and Private [John] Haindel, of Company E, Twelfth Louisiana Battalion. Wounded, Private [John] Fink, Company A, Twelfth Louisiana Battalion. These casualties resulted from a single bomb-shell. The gun carriage at Battery Numbers 10 was slightly injured, but no disabled. I have no other damages to report, although the batteries were struck quiet often by fragments of bomb and rifle shells.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. F. DE GOURNAY,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Left Wing, Heavy Batteries.

Major T. F. WILLSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING, HEAVY BATTERIES,

Port Hudson, May 29, 1863.

COLONEL: I had the Parrott gun and the rifled 24-pounder trailed and pointed yesterday, and bearings marked, so that they could be directed at the mortar-boats during the night. At 11.30 the mortars commenced bombarding when our guns replied, firing at the flags, deliberately and slowly. We fired in all nineteen shots, and this morning the mortar fleet is below the Point, having fallen back during the darkness that preceded daybreak. I owe this result in great part to the excellent management of Lieutenant [L. A.] Schirmer, whom I had placed in charge of the Parrott gun. During the fight the bursting of a bombshell in the rear of the battery wounded 3 men of Company D, Twelfth Louisiana Battalion; 1 seriously. No damage to the works.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. F. DE GOURNAY,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Left Wing, Heavy Batteries.

Lieutenant Colonel M. J. SMITH,

Chief of Heavy Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING, HEAVY ARTILLERY,

Port Hudson, June 5, 1863.

MAJOR: During the furious bombardment by the enemy's mortar boats this afternoon, a shell struck the gun (32-pounder rifled) at Battery Numbers 10, breaking the screw. The damage is easily repaired, and the gun can be used to-night. Another shell fell in the camp near Battery Numbers 9, killing 1 man instantly. The mortar-boats have moved to-day nearer the Point, probably on account of the river falling steadily. They are not much nearer to us, but in batter view. For several days they have been using occasionally extra charges of powder, by which they have attained greater range, and thrown shells beyond Battery Numbers 6. I will take advantage of their new position, and attack them