War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0051 Chapter XXXVII. SIEGE OF PORT HUDSON, LA.

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[Inclosure Numbers 4.]

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS,

New Orleans, La., July 4, 1863.

Major-General BANKS,

Commanding Nineteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: The paroled prisoners have come in, and my information is as nearly positive as human testimony can make it that the enemy are 13,000 strong, and they are fortifying the whole country as they march from Brashear to this place, and are steadily advancing.

I respectfully suggest that, unless Port Hudson be already taken, you can only save this city by sending me re-enforcements immediately and at any cost. It is a choice between Port Hudson and New Orleans.

The attempt to raise troops here is futile. There are at least 10,000 fighting men in this city (citizens), and I do not doubt, from what I see, that these men will, at the first approach of the enemy within view of the city, be against us to a map.

I have the honor to be, &c.,

W. H. EMORY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure Numbers 5.]

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE GULF, NINETEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Before Port Hudson, La., July 5, 1863.

Brigadier General W. H. EMORY,

Commanding Defenses of New Orleans, La.:

GENERAL: The commanding general has this moment received your dispatch of the 4th instant, by the hands of First Lieutenant Woodrow, Seventeenth Infantry, acting aide-de-camp. The general directs me to say that operations here can last but two or three days longer at the outside, and then the whole command will be available to drive back the enemy, who is now annoying our communications and threatening New Orleans. We are to-day effecting the passage of the ditch in front of the right priest-cap. When this operation is decidedd, the commanding general will re-enforce you with the utmost promptitude, and with a large force; but he regards New Orleans as safe, if the navy does its duty in preventing the passage of the river. The general deems your force, though obviously too small, large enough to hold the works on the right bank of the river and to keep New Orleans quiet. Much, in his opinion, very much, will depend upon the management of affairs in the city quietly and with a firm hand.

The people of New Orleans understand, or ought to understand, well that their conduct upon this occasion will be the measure of their treatment hereafter by the military authorities of the United States.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHARD B. IRWIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure Numbers 6.]

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE GULF, NINETEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Before Port Hudson, La., July 5, 1863.

Rear-Admiral D. G. FARRAGUT,

Commanding, &c.:

Your letter of July 2 I received at 5 o'clock last evening. It had been delayed by some mischance upon its way hither. A subsequent