War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0049 Chapter XXXVIII. SIEGE OF PORT HUDSON,LA.

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which we defeated on Teche, and a re-enforcement of from 3,000 to 5,000 cavalry or mounted infantry from Texas. The infantry garrison of Port Hudson and the cavalry force which is hovering on our rear numbered, united, when we arrived here, at least 7,000. Against a combined attack of these forces on both sides of the river, New Orleans could not have been defended.

I shall request General Grant to send me at least --- thousand men as soon as he can possibly spare them, in order that we may secure what we shall so hardly have gained. I am confident, general, of a speedy and favorable result.

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, Washington, D. C.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE, Near Vicksburg, Miss., June 30, 1863.

Major General N. P. BANKS,

Commanding Department of the Gulf:

GENERAL: Feeling a great anxiety to learn the situation at Port Hudson, I send Colonel Kilby Smith to communicate with you. Colonel Smith has been here during the entire siege of Vicksburg, and can inform you fully of the position of affairs at this place. I confidently expected that Vicksburg would have been in our possession before this, leaving me able to send you any force that might be required against Port Hudson. I have a very large force - much more than can be used in the investment of the rebel works - but Johnston still hovers east of Black River. Whether he will attack or not, I look upon now as doubtful. No doubt he would, however, if I should weaken my force to any extent. I have sent into Louisiana to learn the movements of Kirby Smith, but, as yet, hear nothing definite.

Should it be my good fortune, general, to get into Vicksburg while you are still investing Port Hudson, I will commence immediately shipping troops to you, and will send such number as you may indicate as being necessary. The troops of this command are in excellent health and spirits. There is not be slightest indication of despondency among either officers or men.

Hoping to hear favorable news from your field of operations by the return of Colonel Smith, I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSE OF NEW ORLEANS, New Orleans, La., July 3, 1863.

Major-General BANKS,

Commanding Nineteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: The time has come when I think it imperatively necessary that you send me re-enforcements. The enemy are in force at Des Allemands Bayou, on the Vacherie road, and at Whitehall Saw-mill. the Iberville has been fired into and disabled, and is now coming down in tow of the Salie Robinson. I do not think you have one moment to

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