War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0857 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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The general commanding directs me to say that it is desired that you proceed at once to organize your company, with the understanding that it is to be placed on a footing with all troops of the line, and to be mustered unconditionally into the Confederate service for and during the war.

Though you are to be its captain, the men will have the privilege of electing the lieutenants, so soon as its numbers reach the legal standard. You will report your progress from time to time, and, when the requisite number of men are enrolled, and officer will be designated to muster the company into the service.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. H. TAYLOR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY DIVISION,

Numbers 9 [10].

March 24, 1863.

The following regulation of the commanding general is published to the cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia:

No more paroles will be accepted. All prisoners of war or deserters from the enemy falling into the hands of the scouting parties of this division will be sent under guard, by the most practicable route, to Richmond.

By command of Major General J. E. B. Stuart:

R. CHANNING PRICE,

Major, and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

Captain Mosby will please alter the number of General Orders from these headquarters, of March 24, from 9 or 10. The order referred to no more paroles being accepted.

R. CHANNING PRICE,

Major, and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. CAV. DIV., ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

March 25, 1863.

[Captain JOHN S. MOSBY:]

DEAR CAPTAIN: I inclose your evidence of appointment by the President in the Provisional Army of the Confederate States. You will perceive by General Lee's accompanying instructions that you will be continued in your present sphere of conduct and enterprise, and already a captain, you will proceed to organize a band of permanent followers for the war, but by all means ignore the term "Partisan Ranger." It is in bad repute. Call your command "Mosby's Regulars," and it will give it a tone of meaning and solid worth which all the world will soon recognize, and you will inscribe that name of a fearless band of heroes on the pages of our country's history, and enshrine it in the hearts of a grateful people. Let "Mosby's Regulars" be a name of pride with friends and respectful trepidation with enemies.

You will have to be very much on your guard against incorporating in your command deserters from other branches of the service. Insist upon the most unequivocal evidence of honorable discharge in all cases. Non conscripts under and over age will be very advantageous. Their entry into service must be unconditional, excepting that you are their