War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0856 N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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tween him and no one else. The attack and mode of it were his, despite the advice, opinions, counsels, and protests of his grand division commanders. Where I went there was not one chance in twenty of succeeding. He alone is responsible.

I am now satisfied my command was taken from me at the battle of Fredericksburg for the reason that the newspaper had connected my name with the command of the army, and that was also the reason he would not let me cross the river and march here on the south side of the Rappahannock.

To-day, from his own evidence, he cannot tell within 5 miles of where he intended to make his main attack on Fredericksburg and has no other idea of the organization and government of an army than that of arranging it in a way that the commanding general will have nothing to do. The nearer the army reaches that point, the greater excellence in his estimation. In his opinion, this army had become tolerably good during his exercise of its command, and yet it was on the verge of dissolution; he did nothing and knew nothing of it.

We have had another severe storm to-day, and it is not over yet. I am thankful that the army is not on the road, for in no direction could I advance 3 miles a day in the present condition of the country.

Very respectfully, &c.,

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General, Commanding.

CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY DIVISION,

Numbers 7.

March 12, 1863.

Captain John S. Mosby has for a long time attracted the attention of his generals by his boldness, skill, and success, so signally displayed in his numerous forays upon the invaders of his native State. None know his daring enterprise and dashing heroism better than those foul invaders, though strangers themselves to such noble traits.

His late brilliant exploit, the capture of Brigadier-General Stoughton, U. S. Army, 2 captains, 30 other prisoners, together with arms, equipments, and 58 horses, justifies this recognition in general orders. The feat, unparalleled in the war, was performed, in the midst of the enemy's troops at Fairfax Court-House, without loss or injury.

The gallant band of Captain Mosby share the glory as they did the danger of this enterprise, and are worthy of such a leader.

J. E. B. STUART,

Major General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

March 23, 1863.

Captain JOHN S. MOSBY

(Through Major-General Stuart):

CAPTAIN: You will perceive from the copy of the order herewith inclosed,* that the President has appointed you captain of Partisan Rangers.

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*Not found.

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