War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0679 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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on Captain J. S. Mosby was not unworthily bestowed. The point where he struck at the enemy is north of Fairfax Court-House, near the Potomac, and far within the lines of the enemy. I wish I could receive his appointment, or some official notification of it, that I might announce it to him.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

CONFIDENTIAL.] HEADQUARTERS,

Fredericksburg, March 21, 1863.

General J. D. IMBODEN,

Commanding Northwestern Brigade, Shenandoah Mountain:

GENERAL: I am by the Quartermaster-General that Major [H. M.] Bell has been directed to furnish the twenty wagons and teams you require for your expedition.

General Sam. Jones informs me that he will make the proposed movement, to attract the attention of the enemy, to the Kanawha Valley, when you are ready, if you will notify him. I fear there may be some disappointment about your receiving the two regiments you desire. It seems two of his regiments were called to North Carolia this winter. They have been ordered back, but in consequence of the disorganized condition of the State Line, he fears it will be necessary to place them near the salt-works. They need not be absent more than a month, and might march across to Monterey to meet you, or at any other point you may designate. I cannot weaken this army any more than I have done, but should General Jones not be able to spare you his regiments, if he pushes boldly down the Kanawha, and detains the enemy in that quarter, it may serve your purpose as well. I will write to him by this mail to let you know what he can do.

You must send no dispatches by telegraph relative to your movements, or they will become known. The time must, of course, depend upon the condition of the mountain roads, but the sooner you can execute your plan the better.

General Cox has gone with all his disposable force to re-enforce General Rosecrans. There is now but a small force of the enemy in Western Virginia.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

CONFIDENTIAL.] HEADQUARTERS,

Fredericksburg, March 21, 1863.

Major General SAMUEL JONES,

Commanding Department of Western Virginia:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 16th is received. I regret that you think you will not be able to spare re-enforcements to Imboden. I think they would not be absent more than a month, and bold operations in that quarter would relieve any pressure upon your department and prevent any attack.

I am informed that General Cox has gone, with all his disposable force, to re-enforce General Rosecrans. There is but a small force, comparatively, in Western Virginia, and if advantage can be taken of the period when the mountain roads are passable, until Federal troops can