War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0611 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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On the North Carolina road there is a very large amount of Government freight awaiting transportation, much of it bacon and rice.

Want of ability is the invariable excuse for not complying with the wants of Government, which, to a very great degree, is true. In every direction there is an accumulation of freight that is being wasted or damaged for want of protection, and the number of Government agents and messengers accompanying it in the character of protectors and forwarders would, I have not the least doubt, form a full regiment. At the present time there are at this place not less than ten or twelve, and there has been as many as twenty or twenty-fire here at one time. Of those now here, two have been since the 5th of January coming from Atlanta, Ga., and the good in charge of one of them only arrived to-day. The enumerate one-twentieth of the cases of delay would be tedious and useless, as I have already said enough to convince any one that some change is necessary if anything is to be accomplished in the way of transportation.

The question will naturally be asked, what shall or can be done? I answer without hesitation, allow the roads to have mechanics from the army and supplies from iron furnaces, foundries, and rolling-mills, and at the same time let Congress pass an act making it obligatory upon the railroads of the country to perform promptly Government transportation. The law, without allowing men and supplies, will be of no use, for without these the roads cannot exist.

I am prompted to make these remarks by a desire to make some improvement in this branch of the public service, which I consider of vital importance, and not in any captious spirit. I trust, therefore, that they may meet at your hands the consideration which the importance of the matter deserves.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. M. WADLEY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

RICHMOND, February 10, 1863.

Authority is hereby granted Captain Absalom Knotts to raise a battalion in the counties in Western Virginia in the enemy's possession, the same to be mustered into the Confederate service and muster-rolls forwarded to this office.

By command of the Secretary of War:

E. A. PALFREY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

RICHMOND, February 11, 1863.

Authority is hereby granted Major Robert White to raise a battalion of mounted riflemen and cavalry from within the enemy's lines, or in counties so under their control that the conscript law cannot be regularly executed. He will report to Brigadier General J. D. Imboden, and, when the battalion is formed, forward the muster-rolls of the companies to this office.

By command of the Secretary of War:

E. A. PALFREY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.