War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0567 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC,-UNION.

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places have not yet been filled, but will be in a short time. Consequently they regard the present as the best opportunity to make an attack upon our army.

Pickett's division is reported at Hanover Court-House.

Very respectfully,

JUL. STAHEL,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 29, 1863.

Major-General MILROY,

Winchester:

Intelligence from General Hooker of movements by the rebels renders it necessary that a vigilant watch should be kept at all points to discover their purpose. Your position should enable you to have early information of any movement in the Shenandoah Valley or in that direction.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

[Secretary of War.]

BALTIMORE, May 29, 1863.

Brigadier-General SCAMMON,

Charleston, W. Va.:

The following telegram just received from headquarters, Washington:

There are reasons why your force at Harper's Ferry, the Shenandoah Valley, and West Virginia should be on the alert and prepared for an attack.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

Give me indications, if any, in your neighborhood.

DONN PIATT,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Chief of Staff.

(Similar dispatch to Milroy.)

WINCHESTER, VA., May 29, 1863. (Received, War Department, 10.30 p. m.)

Major-General SCHENCK,

Baltimore:

I have learned, through a secret rebel source entitled to some credit, that Lee has a pontoon train about 7 miles long, and that his design is to make a demonstration up the river, draw Hooker out, turn quickly back, throw across his pontoons, and fall suddenly on Hooker, while the cavalry dash around his right and attack him in the rear. Pretty good theory.

R. H. MILROY,

Major-General.

FROM MONROE, May 30, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I went with Major-Generals Keyes to West Point yesterday, and, on consultation with General Gordon, it was unanimously