War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0559 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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The following is a list of transportation accompanying the reserve train:

Trains, &c. Number of army Number of Total number

wagons. pounds carried of pounds

by each. carried.

Division and 13 2,400 31,200

brigade

headquarters

Hospital 28 2,400 67,200

stores, one

wagon per

regiment

Regiment 56 2,400 134,400

officers'

baggage, camp

and garrison

equipage

Regiment 49 2,400 117,600

wagons, with

forage and

rations

Five 15 2,500 37,500

batteries,

with forage

and provisions

Supply train, 71 2,300 163,300

with six days'

rations

Supply train, 33 2,400 86,400

with forage

Supply train, 7 2,400 16,800

with

intrenching

tools

Supply train, 6 2,400 14,400

with medical

stores

Stores for 6 2,400 14,400

sale to

officers

Division 49 1,898 93,002

ordnance

train, small-arms

ammunition

Division 20 1,840 36,800

ordnance

trains,

artillery

ammunition

Total 353 27,738 813,002

transportation

and loading

Trains, &c. Number of rounds Number rounds

small-arms artillery

ammunition ammunition

carried. carried.

Division and brigade -- --

headquarters

Hospital stores, one -- --

wagon per regiment

Regiment officers' -- --

baggage, camp and

garrison equipage

Regiment wagons, with -- --

forage and rations

Five batteries, with -- --

forage and provisions

Supply train, with six -- --

days' rations

Supply train, with forage -- --

Supply train, with -- --

intrenching tools

Supply train, with -- --

medical stores

Stores for sale to -- --

officers

Division ordnance train, 833,000 --

small-arms ammunition

Division ordnance trains, -- 2,976

artillery ammunition

Total transportation and 833,000 2,976

loading

Average load on each wagon, 2,303 pounds.

Pounds.

Each man carried in his knapsack and on his

person eight days' marching ration.................. 16

60 rounds of ammunition.............................. 6

1 blanket, 1 overcoat (or rubber blanket), one-half

shelter-tent, 1 shirt, 1 pair drawers, 1 pair socks,

1 knapsack, and 1 haversack............................ 11

Gun and accouterments.................................. 11

Total weight carried by each man....................... 44

For the purpose of estimating the loss in clothing, camp and garrison equipage thrown away and left on the field, I accompany this report with a list of these articles supplied on requisition from the date of the return to this camp (May 7) to the present date, at which time the men are fully supplied,

The loss in overcoats was probably the greatest, but as the men do not require for the loss, at this season, it does not appear [sic.]. The best criterion by which to judge of the waste is in blankets, the amount drawn for being 3,011. Our effective force being now 8,000, three-eighths of the men have lost one blanket each. The knapsacks drawn amount to 4,614, showing more than half lost, probably on the battle-field, by being relieved of them during action.

Four thousand shelter-tents have been supplied, showing a loss of one-half; 1,768 canteens have been supplied, one-fifth lost; 2,980 haversacks supplied, three-eighths lost; 3,017 rubber blankets supplied, three-eighths lost. The balance, being articles of clothing supposed to be worn out, ar not noticed.

Not having been with the marching column, I cannot decide from observation on the question of the advantage of loading the men heavily and with knapsacks. Reliable officers inform me that the men, though much fatigued, did not straggle, and that the result of the last march is more successful than former marches, when the roads were incumbered by trains. I consider the experiment of using pack-mules successful, and, with the experience we have had in the last march, it will prove an important part of the transportation.

Respectfully submitted by your obedient servant,

W. R. HOPKINS,

Lieutenant Colonel, and Chief Quartermaster Twelfth Army Corps.