War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0521 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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to request that good, serviceable animals may be sent forward as rapidly as possible. Please have as many sent during the week as your officers may be able to procure.

RUFUS INGALLS,

Chief Quartermaster.

CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA.,

May 24, 1863.

General R. E. LEE,

Commanding Army of Northern Virginia:

The practice of seine fishing from the south side of the river affords an opportunity for communication that I must endeavor to put a stop to. I would bring the matter to your notice, that injury to non-combatants and the useless shedding of blood may, if possible, be avoided.

Very respectfully, &c.,

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 24, 1863.

General R. E. LEE,

Commanding Army of Northern Virginia:

GENERAL: Mrs. Fales had a son killed and left upon the field at the battle of Salem Heights, and asks permission to cross the river, accompanied by a soldier who knows the spot, for the purpose of gathering up his remains and bringing them to this side.

I submit her request to you, with the hope that it may be favorably entertained.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS,

May 24, 1863.

Brigadier General D. McM. GREGG,

Commanding Second and Third Divisions of Cavalry, Bealeton:

GENERAL: I am directed by Brigadier-General Pleasonton, commanding, to state you are assigned to the command of the cavalry forces on the Orange Railroad, and that you are required to picket the Rappahannock River as far as the railroad bridge at least, and also the line of railroad, to insure its safety and prevent raids being made on the right flank of the army here. If this duty is well performed, we ought not to be much annoyed by the enemy within the country between you and the army, and, if they should be troublesome, it can only proceed from the residents. These will be made to understand that unless they preserve order they and theirs will be treated as enemies in arms against us, and that the most prompt and summary punishment will be inflicted on them. The residents must be made responsible for the preservation of good order in the districts in which they live.

The general desires that you will spare no labor to place the cavalry under you command in a high state of efficiency at the earliest practicable moment, and keep your command in readiness for any service a