War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0495 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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ticularly to destroy those used for carrying supplies to the enemy across the Rappahannock from the Northern Neck. You will only take property under the provisions of existing orders, viz, General Orders, Numbers 100, War Department, which will be observed. You will probably be able, by sending a small detachment in advance, to entice a force of the enemy over the river for their capture, whch force your main body could secure as prisoners. Captain Mann, of the Oneida Cavalry, and the colonel of the regiment recently doing picket duty on the left, will explain to you the enemy's movements in this respect heretofore. Full information and guides as to affairs on the Neck may be obtained from General Patrick or Colonel Sharpe, provost-marshall-general's department; Captain Wadsworth and others, of General Reynolds' staff; Colonels Morrow, Fairchild, and others, of the First Corps, who have been engaged in expeditions down through the Neck heretofore.

Very respectfully, &c.,

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major-General, Chief of Staff.

BALTIMORE, MD.,

May 16, 1863-4 p.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I suggest that immediate arrangement should be made with the Navy Department to have one gunboat sent up the Kanawha and another kept on the Upper Ohio, and, for the present, at Parkersburg. I telegraphed General Burnside about getting one sent to Kanawha, but got no reply.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE,

May 16, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, Washington:

If General Pope wants General Roberts, I shall have to consent to his being relieved. I hope General Averell many may report without delay.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

BALTIMORE,

May 16, 1863.

Brigadier-General KELLEY,

Grafton, Va.:

You will get troops back along the road and at Harper's Ferry, and properly posted at your best discretion, and soon as possible. There are rumors of apprehended rebel movements down the Valley. Last night's surprise and capture of Captain Summer's cavalry, at Charlestown, may be a premonitory sympton. Some, at least, of the Pennsylvania cavalry sent westward will have to be returned.

General Milroy's infantry, except perhaps Virginia regiments, will have to come back. How much longer will Kenly's brigade be needed west of the mountains? It was a movement made from the exigency of