War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0476 N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA.,

May 13, 1863.

Colonel KILPATRICK,

Commanding Cavalry Brigade:

The major-general commanding directs that you assume commad of the cavalry now with you at Yorktown. Hold your force well in hand, inflicting whatever damage the legitimate rules of war sanction upon the enemy, his supplies, and his communications. You will observe his movements as far as possible. You will take with you from this camp the dismounted men of both regiments, and remount them there with captured animals. You will report by letter and telegraph as occasion requires, holding your command ready to co-operate with this army in its operations. You will furnish General Keyes, or the commanding officer in whose department you may temporarily remain, with copies of your instructions that you may receive from time to time.

Very respectfully,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA.,

May 13, 1863.

Colonel G. H. SHARPE,

Deputy Provost-Marshal-General:

I am directed by the commanding general to say that he learned, through Drs. Letterman and Taylor this afternoo, for the first time, that we should be allowed to lay a bridge at the United States Ford for the passage of our ambulances after our wounded in the vicinity of Chancellorsville. Instructions have been given to throw a bridge across the river early to-morrow morning at the United States Ford, and the commanding general wishes you to make whatever arrangements may be necessary with the officer commanding the Confederate forces at the ford with regard to laying the bridge, and to have it taken up when no longer required for the purpose indicated.

Very respectfully, &c.,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 13, 1863.

Brigadier-General WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, &c.:

GENERAL: I would respectfully submit the following statement:

Immediately after the falling back of our army, I sent out detachments of cavalry to scour the country around from about 2 miles above United States Ford to near Aquia Creek, to pick up stragglers and drive them in this direction. In this way I have succeededin arresting a great many. I have learned, however from parties who have come in within the last twenty-four hours, that far out beyond our lines, along the White Ridge road, about 18 miles from Falmouth, and in the vicinity of White Ridge, the country is swarming with them. They belong mainly to the First, Eleventh,and Twelfth Corps, and in many instances have taken the clothing of the inhabitants from them by force, and have gone in the direction of Alexandria. Other depredations