War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0461 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

Colonel Latham at West Union, who informs me that he is convinced that no considerable force of cavalry can have passed in the direction of Middlebourne. I believe it to be a thieving party in search of horses.

What is the news from the east?

B. S. ROBERTS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Camp near Falmouth, Va., May 9, 1863.

General R. E. LEE,

Commanding Army of Northern Virginia:

The relatives and friends of several of the officers of this army who fell in the recent battles have visited my headquarters with the view, if possible, of proceeding to the battle-fields to recover the bodies of those near to them. I therefore have the honor to aks whether any person will be permitted to visit the battle-fields for the purpose indicated, or whether any arrangement can be made for sending to the lines of this army the bodies of such of our fallen officers as may have friends here seeking for them.

Very respectfully, &c.,

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

May 10, 1863.

Major General JOSEPH HOOKER,

Commanding U. S. Forces on the Rappahannock:

GENERAL: In reply to your communication of the 9th instant, I have the honor to state that it will give me pleasure to afford every facility to relatives and friends of officers killed in the late battles to recover their bodies, but I have no means of identifying them or of ascertaining the fields on which they fell. If you will have me informed, I will cause search to be made.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

WINCHESTER, VA.

May 10, 1863.

Major-General SCHENCK, Baltimore, Md.:

I can hear nothing that is going on east, west, or south. I would like much to know what is going on in Western Virginia. Elliott returned yesterday. My dispatch to him to return, in obedience to your order, reached him at New Market. There were not more than 250 troops in the Valley, and he could have gone on to Staunton without resistance. It is a pity he could not have been allowed to have gone on as far as Harrisonburg, where Jones had left all his wagons, tents, and camp equipage, which could have been taken. I did not think there was any utter madness in the movement. Thirty prisoners were brought in.

R. H. MILROY,

Major-General.