War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0455 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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The Ninth, Tenth, and Fourteenth Virginia Infantry, the Fourteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, with a battery, are intended to occupy Beverly.

These forces, in the positions indicated, constantly moving against the enemy in front and scouting between each other's positions, may effectually preventh further raids, and secure this portion of Western Virginia.

Rain continued during the night and all of to-day, having flooded the streams in all directions and rendered the roads impassable for the time being to loaded wagons.

B. S. ROBERTS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 9, 1863-8 a.m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Have you received any late news from Yorktown? I am extremely anxious to know what damage three regiments of dragoons did to the Aquia and Richmond Railroad after they were detached from Stoneman's column. They went to Gloucester Point, where General Keyes had communication with them three days ago. Stoneman has recrossed the Rappahannock, and is now on his way to this camp.

HOOKER,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT

May 9, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

It is very important for Hooker to know exactly what damage is done to the railroads at all points between Fredericksburg and Richmond. As yet we have no word as to whether the crossings of the North and South Anna, or any of them, have been touched. There are four of these crossings; that is, one, on each road on each stream. You readily perceive why this information is desired. I suppose Kilpatrick or Davis can tell.* Please ascertain fully what was done, and what is the present condition, as near as you can, and advise me at once.

A. LINCOLN.

WASHINGTON, D. C.,

May 9, 1863-10.55 a.m.

Major-General HOOKER:

Measures have been taken to get as full and exact report of what was done by your cavalry and the condition of the enemy's communications as possible, which will be transmitted as soon as it is received.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

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*See Kilpatrick to Dix, and King to Butterfield, May 9, pp. 456, 457, and Dix to Lincoln, May 11, p. 465.

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