War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0453 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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their brilliant exploit is fully appreciated at headquarters. They are in good condition and after a day's rest will be fit, as they are anxious for further active service. All quiet on our front, and nothing new here.

RUFUS KING,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

BALTIMORE,

May 8, 1863-7 a.m.

Brigadier-General BARRY,

Wheeling, Va.;

I have sent and am sending all troops I possibly can westward from Harper's Ferry and Winchester. Another regiment of cavalry and one of infantry are now on their way to Grafton, and another regiment of infantry will follow to-morrow. On the demand of the Governor of Ohio, I have ordered back Captain Dod, who came from that State, with a few troops from Grafton to Wheeling. Send him, immediately on his arrival at Wheeling, down to Parkersburg. General Kelley was ordered last night to Grafton.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

BATLIMORE,

May 8, 1863-9 a.m.

Brigadier-General KELLEY,

New Creek (or on the road to Grafton):

As the Ninth and Tenth Virginia Infantry arrive at Grafton, push them on, if you find it best and most advisable, by way of Wheeling to Parkersburg. In that case you must send and secure transportation down the river. Observe the position of the enemy at all times, and hold railroad transportation ready to move forces this way if he comes eastward.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK

Major-General, Commanding.

BALTIMORE;

May 8, 1863-3 p.m.

Major-General MILROY,

Commanding Second Div., Eighth Armyuu Corps, Winchester, Va.:

The following has just been received from General Halleck:

I have just learned that Elliott's cavalry has been sent to Woodstock and Edenburg. They are of no possible use there except to be captured. You will maintain only a small force at Winchester as an outpost, and employ the remainder of Milroy's troops for the protection of the railroad and operations against the enemy in Western Virginia. For Milroy to attempt operations up the Shenandoah at the present time is utter madness.

When can the remaining infantry and a battery of Hay's brigade be ready for the cars at Martinsburg of Harper's Ferry? You will send them as quickly as you can, notifyinig me always at what hour transportation for a regiment will be needed on the railroad, adn at which point.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.