War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0449 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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in and about Fredericksburg will be sent over in boats whenever I may be ready to receive them. I will have a party with boats opposite the Lacy house at 8 a. m. to-morrow.

Very respectfully, &c.,

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, D. C.,

May 8, 1863 - 4 p. m.

Major-General HOOKER:

The news is here of the capture by our forces of Grand Gulf. A large and very important thing. General Willich, and exchanged prisoner, just from Richmond, has talked with me this morning. He was there when our cavalry cut the roads in that vicinity. He says there was not a sound pair of legs in Richmond, and that our men, had they known it, could have safely gone in and burned everything and brought in Jeff. Davis.

We captured and paroled 300 or 400 men. He says as he came to City Point there was an army 3 miles long (Longstreet's, he thought) moving toward Richmond.

Milroy has captured a dispatch of General Lee, in which he says his loss was fearful in his last battle with you.

A. LINCOLN.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, D. C., May 8, 1863 - 8.30 p. m.

Major-General HOOKER:

DEAR SIR: The tone of two telegrams received - one from General Curtis and the other from Rosecrans - I think will please you, and I therefore send them to you, as the cheering voice of brother soldiers will be welcome to you. I also send one from Governor Seymour. My telegram was a simple announcement of results, and was sent to all the Governors and commanders in order to let the public know the trough. Several of the Governors have answered, and all manifest their unshaken confidence, in you an your army.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

SAINT LOUIS, MO.,

My 8, 1863 - 11.10 a. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I thank you for your tidings from the Army of the Potomac. Partial reverses should only stimulate new energy and immediate recovery. The general result is far worse for the enemy. Even small re-enforcements and persevering assaults will force him to retire. The country and troops of the West are inspired with confidence, and send back a voice of cheer and sympathy to their comrades in the Army of the Potomac.

SAML. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

29 R R-VOL XXV, PT II