War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0436 N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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BALTIMORE,

May 6, 1863.

Major-General SCHENCK,

Washington, D. C.:

The following received:

CLARKSBURG, VA.,

May 6, 1863 - 7.30 a. m.

My information is perfectly reliable that Jones' Jenkins', and Imboden's force are all massed at Weston. They double any force I can move against them, and at the same time protect this point and keep my rear open. They have about 4,000 cavalry, and whit fresh horses (they have pressed all the cavalry) they can effectually cut off trains of supplies and act upon the railroad. I have in all little over 450 cavalry, and this broken down. It is folly to call the Twelfth Pennsylvania Regiment cavalry. They have but 320 men, and their colonel informed me that 20 of his horses could not get up yesterday.

The largest forces of the enemy ever in this region of Virginia are now here, and our forces are now weaker than ever; therefore you have underrated this raid. I think it has just commenced.

Send me all the cavalry and other forces you can spare without delay. As I expect to be cut off from Parkersburg, I shall rely on supplies from Baltimore.

B. S. ROBERTS,

Brigadier-General.

Heavy storm yesterday destroyed the western wires and caused delay. Above dispatch came by Philadelphia. Lightburn is at Grafton, with detachment of troops; reports all quiet. Asks permission to turn over his command to Mulligan and return to his command in Louisiana, his leave having expired. Nothing new from Kelley.

WM. H. CHESEBROUGH,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

BALTIMORE,

May 6, 1863 - 10.30 p. m.

Major-General SCHENCK,

Washington, D. C.:

Just received the following:

NEW CREEK, 8.40 p. m.

If you deem the information reliable, I respectfully suggest that the Ninth and Tenth Virginia Regiments be ordered at once to Martinsburg, where cars should be in readiness to move them. These two regiments were organized in the counties now held and threatened by the enemy. I will send the Fourteenth Virginia also from here as soon as Smith returns.

I fear it will be important of weaken rowlesburg, as the enemy may cross by Leading Creek and Beverly, and down Cheat, and destroy bridge and trestles. I will order the Fourteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry to move as soon as possible.

Will you please direct the Baltimore and Ohio railroad agent to send cars to Harper's Ferry? It has been raining for the last twenty-four hours, and the streams are rising rapidly. I fear the trestle-work in several of the bridges may be carried out. If the enemy are at Buckhannon and west, with a force approximate to General Roberts' report, he will, in my judgment, attempt to take clarksburg and Grafton, as the country between Clarksburg and Parkersburg is very poor, roads exceedingly bad, and no subsistence to be had for man or horse.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

The Ninth and Tenth are in Hay's brigade. Have taken no action, al I doubt the expediency of weakening winchester so materialy, with Elliott so far up the Valley.

WM. H. CHESEBROUGH,

Assistant Adjutant-General.