War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0429 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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may be necessary, both there and at Pittsburgh, can be procured at the arsenal in the latter city whenever needed. I have selected defensive positions for both cities. There is no large amount of public stores here, and none at all at Pittsburgh, except those at the arsenal. Advices just received from Colonel Mulligan report the rebels to be 5,000 strong under Jones and 3,000 under Imboden, and that all have fallen back to Beverly.

WILLIAM F. BARRY,

Brigadier-General.

BALTIMORE, MD.,

May 5, 1863. (Sent 10.30 a. m.)

Brigadier-General KELLEY,

Commanding, &c., New Creek:

The following telegrams just received:

CLARKSBURG, VA., May 4, 1863.

Telegram just received from Charleston that the enemy occupy Sutton; force not known. Also telegram from Colonel F. W. Thompson, at Lost Creek, that he has reliable information that Jones, with 2,000 cavalry, joined Imboden and Jackson's forces at Weston to-day; that their united forces are supposed to be 10,000 strong. He also reports that General Wilder [?], with 4,000 infantry, had left New River to join General Jenkins, reported to have 2,500 men, to operate in the Kanawha Valley. You will see the necessity of throwing large forces into West Virginia, to prevent its being overrun.

B. S. ROBERTS,

Brigadier-General.

CLARKSBURG, May 5, 1863.

What troops can you send to this place, and to Grafton, within thirty six hours? They are the important points, and must be held.

B. S. ROBERTS,

Brigadier-General.

This notice and call from Roberts is, perhaps, not without reason. I do not apprehend that the rebels design now to return to Grafton or Clarksburg. They may strike at the Northwestern Railroad lower down, at Parkersburg and the Kanawha. Hooker's movements must withdraw present danger from the Valley, and you can send to Roberts now the Fourteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and perhaps some little infantry, at least Showalter's command. Do this, or whatever else possible, and let me hear from you. Transportation for what you send may have to be supplied from here.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

NEW CREEK, VA.,

May 5, 1863.

Lieutenant-Colonel CHESEBROUGH,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Baltimore:

I most respectfully suggest to the commanding general to send to General Roberts positive orders to move on the enemy at once, unless he has reliable information that would induce him to doubt the soundness of this suggestion. I fear the rebels will get out of West Virginia before General Roberts gets ready to leave Clarksburg.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.