War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0416 N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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CLEVELAND. OHIO,

May 4, 1863.

Major T. T. ECKERT,

Washington, D. C.:

Lieutenant David sends me the following:

Enemy is at Weston. His horse being augmented by rebel citizens. Roberts thinks numbers have been underrated. Their scouts and pickets indicate their route to be Parkersburg. They can go there without trouble. country entirely open to them. Kelley reports force advancing on him down New Creek. We have railroad communication with Parkersburg, but have given it up every night as lost. Not guarded.

A. STAGER.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 5, 1863 - 12.15 a. m.

General D. BUTTERFIELD,

United States Ford:

Gibbon holds Fredericksburg. The enemy have made no attempt to take the town.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

MAY 5, 1863 - 8.30 a. m.

General D. BUTTERFIELD,

Headquarters:

Scout William Chase, sent the 3rd instant to ascertain the position and strength of the enemy in the vicinity of Guiley's Station, returned this morning. He encountered no force on the opposite shore, except a few cavalry pickets. He was at Guiney's Station the night of the 3rd, and up to 3 p. m. yesterday. Saw two trains come up the night of the 3rd, apparently empty, and both returned filled with baggage and tents. The railroad appeared to be well guarded, especially at the bridges. Only two trains came up to Hamilton's Crossing yesterday. They had no troops, and returned with tents and baggage. Some small squads of cavalry were riding about. Directly opposite to Guiney's Station is an infantry camp of about two regiments. Force in all that vicinity estimated not to exceed 2,000. The two trains that went up and down on the night of the 3rd were the same that went up and down yesterday.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

BANKS' FORD, VA.,

May 5, 1863 - 9.30 a. m.

General BUTTERFIELD:

I must be ordered to United States Ford by mistake. I have been here all the time, and took up my bridges this morning, and I fear they will be destroyed if I leave. As Colonel Stuart urges it so much, to save, as he thinks, our mules and wagons, I wish to make an effort to save them. I am almost too much exhausted to go up, but will attempt it, if possible, and hope a messenger may meet me along the telegraph wire if it is a mistake.

H. W. BENHAM,

Brigadier-General.