War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0382 N.VA., W.VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, May 3, 1863-8.15 p.m.

General BUTTERFIELD:

We can do nothing at present about forage and subsistence. If we succeed, we shall march at one to Fredericksburg. If we fail, we must try soon to reach our depots. The question must soon resolve itself. I propose to order all empty teams down to Falmouth.

RUFUS INGALLS,

Chief Quartermaster.

BANKS' FORD, VA., May 3, 1863-9.15 p.m.

Colonel INGALLS,

United States Ford:

COLONEL: Eighty-six Reserve Artillery animals were sent to headquarters this evening, to be there at 9 o'clock. Three hundred and eighty-four headquarters-trains animals are now here. If taken, they leave the bridges entirely without animals.

H. W. BENHAM,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

BANKS' FORD, VA., May 3, 1863-9.15 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER:

United States Ford:

GENERAL: One brigade was placed down according to orders when the enemy retreated, with the concerted opinion of General Hunt, who had information that forty loads of artillery ammunition had been ordered here, and, it was understood, was to be crossed here. The bridge can be taken up at any hour, if so ordered. Shall I take it up?

H. W. BENHAM,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

FALMOUTH, VA., May 3, 1863-10.55 p.m.

Major-General BUTTERFIELD:

Chief of Staff:

General Sedgwick's ordnance officer is here - a very competent person. The small-arms ammunition went forward this afternoon. The artillery ammunition goes at midnight. Waits until then for supplies ordered from Aquia, but in any event moves at that time with what is on the train.

General Gibbon says that all has been done that can be done. The officer has been in consultation with him. A guard of fifty accompanies the train, sufficient, in General Gibbon's opinion, to protect it, and with aid, if necessary, from General Sedgwick to keep open the communication.

Respectfully,

S. F. BARSTOW,

Assistant Adjutant-General.