War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0375 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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be particularly watchful at Berryville and across into Loudoun. Imboden, Jackson, and Jones have made a junction 6 miles south of Bridgeport. Roberts, Kenly, and Wilkinson have joined at Clarskburg. They will fight to-day if the rebels do not run.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

BALTIMORE, May 2, 1863.

Major-General MILROY,

Winchenster:

Roberts reports Jones retreating by Philippi. Imboden and Jackson supposed to be in small parties plundering everything in Lewis and Upshur Counties. Enemy in all supposed to have 4,000 cavalry, besides other forces. Will direct Scammon to send what force he can to Summerville. You should send what cavalry you can to Moorefield, or in that direction, with a section or two of artillery, and make a reconnaissance up the Valley, to which Jones will probably return. Roberts and Kelley will pursue south from Clarksburg.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

BALTIMORE, May 2, 1863.

Brigadier-General SCAMON,

Charleston, W. Va.:

I took the responsibility of waiving delay in purchase of horses. They are sending to you 1,000, in lots, as fast as they can be purchased, and I have notified you of the thousand equipments from Cincinnati. Railroad now all clear of the enemy, and damage nearly all repaired. Jones retreating rapidly by way of Philippi. Roberts made a handsome and successful charge on his rear yesterday.

Imboden and Jackson reported to be plundering horses, cattle, and everything in Upshur and Lewis Counties.

Roberts and Kelley will pursue south from Clarksburg. You should send whatever force you can to Summerville. Milroy is directed to send some cavalry from Winchester to Moorefield. Jones will probably return to the Valley.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

BALTIMORE, May 2, 1863-10.55 a.m.

Major SHOWALTER,

(Care of Lieutenant-Colonel Cross, Pittsburgh):

You will proceed with whatever forces you can command, including those which you took to Pittsburgh, to Uniontown, and thence upon Morgantown, where I think you will now find no enemy. My object is to have you return as rapidly as possible to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at the point from which you left it. We are occupying and working the railroad now from this point to Grafton and 18 miles beyond,