War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0318 N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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Maryland Heights to replace the five regiments thus taken. I send to-day, from the forts here, the Fifth York Artillery, numbering 600, but this includes and withdraws the company garrisoning Fort Dix, at the Relay House. it is the utmost I can possibly do.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, D. C.,

April 30, 1863.

Major-General SCHENCK,

Baltimore, Md.:

If you want more troops in the west and at Harper's Ferry, why do you leave so large a force at Winchester? As I have often repeated to you, verbally and in writing, that is no place to fight a battle. It is merely and outpost which should not be exposed to an attack in force.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

BALTIMORE, MD.,

April 30, 1863-9 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

The following dispatches just received from New Creek, 10 a. m., 30th:

The following dispatch just received from Colonel Mulligan. His information derived from the rebel officer is undoubtedly substantially correct:

"My prompt movement on Monday to Greenland Gap prevented Jones' reserves from following him. May I suggest you call the attention of the General-in-Chief to the probable fact of this being a grand combined movement to destroy the road effectually and recover Western Virginia. Harper's Ferry should be strengthened, if possible?"

B. F. KELLEY.

GRAFTON, VA.,

April 30, 1863.

General KELLEY:

I defy all the rebels in Western Virginia. God and the right.

JAS. S. MULLIGAN.

GRAFTON, VA.,

April 30, 1863.

General KELLEY:

From a rebel officer, captured last night, I learn the enemy's strength and plans. General Jones, whom we engaged yesterday, has a force of 3,000, composed of the Sixth, Seventh, Eleventh, and Twelfth Regiments of Virginia Cavalry, and three battalions of Maryland cavalry. The Maryland line of infantry and two sections of a battery are moving to their support. General Imboden, with a force of 2,000, had arranged to unite with Jones at Philippi but our artillery on Sunday last prevented the connection. The plan was, that this force of 5,000 should destroy the towns and railroad, while a strong rebel force should engage the attention of Winchester and other points. The detachments I ordered to the support of Rowlesburg, under Colonel James Quirk, returned at daylight. Rowlesburg is safe. If the enemy pour upon us, I shall make your Fifth Brigade.

JAS. A. MULLIGAN.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK.