War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0307 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Simultaneous with the advance of your column on the Bowling Green road, if at all, a column will also advance on the Telegraph road, and between you will sweep the country between the two highways and the railroad. You will be within easy communication, and both columns will spring to one another's assistance in case of encountering any considerable resistance, which can best be judged of by the magnitude of the fire. Keep your provisions and ammunition and forage replenished, leaving as much of your train to be brought afterward as practicable. Trains will only embarrass and check your forward movement, and must not accompany you, unless it be the pack train.

It may be expedient for you to join the right wing on the south bank of river, and under cover of it to Fredericksburg. Be observant of your opportunities, and when you strike let it be done to destroy. When you move forward, if you want all your artillery, the batteries of the reserve here can be called for. The enemy have at Hamilton's a pontoon train. The general expects that you will not permit them to cross the river. You will find an able commander in Major-General Reynolds.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major-General, Chief of Staff.

APRIL 30, 1863.

Major-General HOOKER,

[Chancellorsville:]

Sedgwick asks if column to move on Telegraph road simultaneous with advance on Bowling Green road is to be portion of his present command. One portion of your letter directs him to move his whole force on Bowling Green road. I presumed that contingency of moving forces on the two roads was the division of forces by enemy. Am I right?

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major-General, Chief of Staff.

CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA.,

April 30, 1863-11.30 a. m.

Major-General SEDGWICK, Commanding, &c.:

Let the demonstration be suspended until further orders.

Very respectfully, &c.,

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major-General, Chief of Staff.

CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA.,

April 30, 1863-12.15 p. m.

Major-General SEDGWICK:

The general desires to know if two of your bridges-one from Franklin's and one from Reynolds'-cannot be taken up before night and moved without knowledge of enemy.*

Very respectfully, &c.,

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major-General, Chief of Staff.

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*Taken up from Sedgwick's crossing. See butterfield to Gibbon, 9.30 p. m., p. 312.

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