War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0278 N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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What few camps that were visible, however, appeared to be occupied as usual. Observations will be made from daybreak in the morning, continually, unless I receive orders to the contrary.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. S. C. LOWE,

Chief of Aeronauts, Army of the Potomac.

CAMP NEAR FALMOUTH, VA.,

April 28, 1863-11.45 p. m.

Major-General SEDWICK,

Commanding, &c.:

I have the honor herewith to transmit a copy of a dispatch which has just been received from the major-general commanding. I also inclose a copy of the same for Major-General Reynolds, which you are desired to have sent to that officer at once.

Very respectfully, &c.,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Morrisville, Va., April 28, 1863-3 p. m.

Major-General BUTTERFIELD:

Considering the state of affairs here, it will be advisable to suspend the crossing of the troops under Generals Sedgwick and Reynolds until further orders, except the number necessary to protect the bridges after they are thrown, which will be as already directed. Be pleased to have it communicated.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HARRISBURG, April 28, 1863.

(Received 9.30 a. m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

The following dispatch just received:

PITTSBURG, 28th.

Governor CURTIN:

An express messenger from Morgantown, by express train from Uniontown, arrived here at 2 o'clock this morning, with intelligence that 4,000 rebel cavalry were within 2 miles of Morgantown at 2 o'clock yesterday, coming into Pennsylvania. The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, between Grafton and Cumberland, is torn up.

All the foregoing is confirmed by intelligence from Wheeling. We are without arms, artillery, or ammunition here. What can you do for us?

THOMAS M. HOWE,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Pennsylvania.

Have you any information? If it is reliable, what force, if any, can you oppose to the rebels? We have no force in the State of any kind, as you are aware. Be pleased to telegraph me as soon as possible, as there is much alarm in this part of Pennsylvania threatened.

A. G. CURTIN,

Governor of Pennsylvania.