War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0271 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

CLARKSBURG, [April] 27, 1863.

Brigadier-General ROBERTS:

General Jones is menacing Rowlesburg with a large force. He has sent part toward Fellowsville, on the turnpike; from thence to Tunnelton and Newburg, on the railroad. This would completely surround Rowlesburg, and stop all supplies and communication with that point. Could part of Mulligan's force be sent there?

N. WILKINSON,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

BALTIMORE, April 27, 1863.

Brigadier-General KELLEY,

New Creek, Va.:

Wilkinson has just telegraphed from Clarksburg as follows:

Scout at Rowlesburg, from Cranberry, just now reports telegraph and railroad at latter place destroyed. The rebels crossed at Cranberry early this morning, from 800 to 1,000 strong; their destination Kingwood. General Jones has started a force to Fellowsville; thence to Tunnelton or Newburg. This will completely surround Rowlesburg, and cut off all communication.

N. WILKINSON,

Colonel, Commanding.

You should send the Maryland regiments, or whatever force can be spared from New Creek, westward beyond Piedmont, to check the enemy on this side. I will telegraph Wilkinson and Roberts to do all they can from Grafton, or from the west and south. Meantime, let a force push on westward, along the Northwestern turnpike, occupying, as you may think advisable to direct, such points as may protect the road or hem in the rebels and cut off their retreat south, and co-operate with Roberts and Mulligan. I will inform General Roberts.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

CLARKSBURG, April 27, 1863.

Brigadier General B. S. ROBERTS:

The sacrifice of machinery and cars is nothing in getting re-enforcements to Rowlesburg-the importance of saving the bridge and trestling. If not re-enforced immediately, they must cut their way out, or be sacrificed with the structures there.

N. WILKINSON,

Colonel, Commanding.

CLARKSBURG, [April] 27, 1863.

Brigadier-General ROBERTS:

Glad to hear from you. Seven thousand rations are on the road to you, and another train will start to-night. It was an infernal scare at Grafton. The operator left, and I guess every one else. As advised, I burned a bridge and tore up track to prevent enemy getting here by rail. At 6 this evening the wires commenced talking feebly from Grafton. Mulligan, it seems, is there, and all right. Have no word from Rowlesburg. Am exceedingly anxious about the troops there. Rebels reported at Morgantown. Have no knowledge of the whereabouts of our immediate opponents, but fear an attack before morning. Get here