War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0270 N.VA., W.VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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who furnished the information upon which was based the statements offered for transmission to those papers last night in Washington respecting a submarine cable said to be in use by the enemy between Falmouth and Fredericksburg; also the information upon which was founded the article in the Inquier of Saturday last upon the same subject. If the names of these parties are not given, it is my intention to suppress the circulation of the two papers named in the Army of the Potomac, and exclude their correspondents from its lines.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE, April 27, 1863.

Major General R. H. MILROY,

Winchester, Va.:

I have communicated with General Halleck. He says:

I think Elliott should have full power to act at his discretion as he may learn the movements of the enemy. He is capable and prudent.

You will instruct General Elliott accordingly.

I telegraphed General Halleck that I thought the movement you suggested to Woodstock and Harrisonburg, though bold, yet practicable, and such as would probably prove effective and successful. It would be necessary, however, to move quickly, and to be guarded against the enemy, possibly now at Staunton and east of the Blue Ridge.

My latest dispatch from the railroad to-day reports:

Telegraph and railroad at Cranberry destroyed. The rebels crossed at Cranberry early this morning, from 800 to 1,000 strong, their destination Kingwood.

General Jones has started a force to Fellowsville, thence to Tunnelton or Newburg. This will completely surround Rowlesburg and cut off all communication.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

BALTIMORE, April 27, 1863.

Major General R. H. MILROY,

Winchester, Va.:

On reflection, I think Elliott should not attempt a reconnaissance beyond Woodstock. There is increasing probability that a large movement is preparing by the rebels for the Valley, and it will not do to hazard a large and distant detachment from Winchester just now. As to Jones, he has only cavalry with him, and has gone westward with that, or one of his colonels ([A. H.] Harman) has. They were repulsed at New Creek, and struck the railroad first at Oakland, then burned the bridge over the Youghiogheny, west of that point, and made attack at Rowlesburg. But we have the railroad and wires repaired again westward to the Youghiogheny burned bridge, and troops will proceed there to-night. Kelley has gone westward on the Northwest turnpike. Jones will probably unite west of the mountains with Jackson and Imboden, at Clarksburg, instead of coming to Grafton, has got himself and the country thereabouts in a panic. Inform me as soon as you hear again from Elliott.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.