War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0261 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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BALTIMORE, MD., April 26, 1863-1.30 a.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Fitzhugh Lee is reported on the Manassas Gap Railroad, 2 miles east of the Blue Ridge, with five regiments of cavalry and two batteries. General Heintzelman should ascertain at once if this be so.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE, April 26, 1863.

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, Washington, D. C.:

General Milroy sends the following:

I have just received a message from General Elliott, at Lost River, 5 miles beyond Wardensville. He found the river too high to cross with his infantry and artillery. Sent on a regiment of cavalry toward Moorefield. Says he cannot cross his infantry and artillery without bridging, and he has not tools to build a bridge. I think before he can cross, Jones will have escaped. What do you say to having Elliott go from Wardensville to Woodstock, then up the Valley to Harrisonburg, to head Jones off?

R. H. MILROY.

Shall I direct this movement? I am inclined to consent to it. It is a bold, but I believe would be an effective and successful, movement. General Elliott has four regiments of infantry, two regiments of cavalry, and one or two batteries.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

BALTIMORE, MD., April 26, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I have fears for New Creek to-day. An infantry company from that post, guarding Greenland Gap, was attacked yesterday by the advance of Jones, 200 cavalry, and fought from 4 p.m. until dark. Still holding the position, but the rebels have probably come up in force to-day, bringing artillery. Nothing from Roberts yet to-day.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 26, 1863-1.45 p.m.

Major-General SCHENCK,

Baltimore, Md.:

You have abundant forces and the use of the railroad. If you have any apprehension for New Creek, concentrate troops there without delay.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.