War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0256 N.VA., W.VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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are kept in camp and do not go to the river. Each corps will march with one battery and two ambulances to division and the pack train of small ammunition. If necessary, a small number of wagons can accompany the column to the camp with forage for animals. The balance of the trains will be parked in the vicinity of Banks' Ford, off the road and convenient to crossing the river at that point, the ammunition wagons and ambulances being in readiness to take the lead in the train. No extra guards for this part of the train will be required. Corps commanders can leave behind such men of those whose term of service is about to expire as they think proper, with such instructions for the safety of the camps and preservation of the public property as they may deem necessary. All property not removed with the troops must be turned in to the quartermaster.

Corps commanders will consider so much of the above as relates to the destination of their commands as strictly confidential.

Very respectfully, &c.,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, April 26, 1863.

General SLOCUM,

Twelfth Corps:

The commanding general directs that you have all your trains leave with your command.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CIRCULAR.] HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS,

April 26, 1863.

If there is in this command such a person as the correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer, he will, by direction of the commanding general of the Army of the Potomac, be immediately sent out of the lines of the army, never to return.

By command of Major-General Stoneman:

A. J. ALEXANDER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SUFFOLK, VA., April 26, 1863.

Major-General HOOKER,

Army of the Potomac:

Longstreet is still here. Heavy artillery is coming to him from Petersburg. The storm has ceased; mud drying up. Advise me in cipher of as much as you deem proper of your operations.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

APRIL 26, 1863.

Major-General PECK,

Suffolk, Va.:

Your dispatch received. I have been delayed in my operations by the severe storm. I have communicated to no one what my intentions are. If you were here, I could properly and willingly impart them to you. So much is found out by the enemy in my front with regard to