War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0254 N.VA., W.VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXVII.

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BUCKAHANNON, VA., April 25, [1863]-3 p.m.

General KELLEY,

Harper's Ferry:

I have heard nothing from Beverly or Colonel Latham since 6 p.m. yesterday.

The troops that reach Grafton should force a march to Philippi, where Colonel Latham attempted to retreat. I don't know whether he succeeded or not, but a rapid movement on Philippi may save him.

B. S. ROBERTS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HARPER'S FERRY, VA., April 25, 1863-11 p.m.

Lieutenant-Colonel CHESEBROUGHT,

Asst. Adjt. General, Baltimore:

The following dispatch from General Roberts and Colonel Wilkinson just received:

HEADQUARTERS, Buckahannon, Va., April 25, 1863.

Brigadier-General KELLEY,

Harper's Ferry:

Just heard from Colonel Latham. He was near Philippi. Had a running fight of eight hours. Proposes to join me, if possible, to-morrow night.

B. S. ROBERTS,

Brigadier-General.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

APRIL 26, 1863.

Major-General HEINTZELMAN,

Commanding Defenses of Washington:

The following dispatch has just been received:

WARRENTON JUNCTION, April 26, 1863.

General WILLIAMS:

A man by the name of George W. Lake, a resident of Maine, and townsman of Colonel Sawtelle, quartermaster, and a very intelligent and apparently a very reliable gentleman, has just arrived within our lines from Staunton, via Harrisonburg, New Market, and Thorton's Gap. He reports that on Tuesday, the 21st instant, Jones was at Harrisonburg, and Imboden not far off. Their whole force about 6,000, mostly cavalry. They had just been issued ten days' rations, and it was understood that they were intending to turn Milroy, and destroy possibly the railroad bridge on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at the mouth of South Branch of the Potomac and Cacapon Rivers, which has heretofore been done by Imboden. The people of the country are expecting an advance of Hooker's army on Gordonsville, via Culpeper, and it was rumored that pontoon bridges had been thrown across the river for that purpose. He estimates the Confederate army at 600,000 strong, and, from what he has heard, should judge that we had a large force in front of us at Fredericksburg.

Hill had 50,000 in North Carolina when Mr. Lake left there, six weeks ago; from 50,000 to 60,000 at Charleston during the recent engagement. Two iron-clads at Wilmington, N. C., one at least completed by this time, built to run the blockade, which is run with great regularity. Danville Railroad not completed yet.

GEORGE STONEMAN,

Major-General, Commanding Cavalry Corps.

To which the following answer has been sent:

That we have much more reliable information than this man has furnished. We know the strength of the enemy in front, and he is looking for us to advance in this vicinity. Jones has an irregular force of not to exceed 3,000. His intentions we know nothing of.

JOSEPH HOOKER.

The foregoing is sent for you information.

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major-General, Chief of Staff.