War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0242 Chapter XXXVII. N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA.

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parties, the enemy had fallen back with all troops as far as Harrisonburg. In a dispatch to-day he says:

From information received, which I deem reliable, the baggage of Jackson's army and some artillery and ordnance stores arrived at Staunton some ten days since.

These things corroborate the reports I get from Generals Scammon and Roberts.

ROBT. C. SCHNECK,

Major-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJT. General 'S OFFICE,

Numbers 182. Washington, April 21, 1863.

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V. Brigadier General G. Marston, U. S. Volunteers, is hereby relieved from duty in the Army of the Potomac, and will report in person, without delay, to Major-General Heintzelman, commanding Department of Washington, for duty.

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By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WARRENTON JUNCTION, VA.,

April 22, 1863.

General S. WILLIAMS,

Asst. Adjt. General, Army of the Potomac:

Averell's division and Davis' brigade are on the railroad, half way between Warrenton and the Junction. Gregg's division and Buford's brigade are at the Junction. All are on the railroad. As we have not, nor, by being there, do we require to transports our supplies, I shall,make arrangements to keep on hand two day's rations of long, and six of short, forage, and eight of subsistence stores. i patrol the road the Bristoe Station, and have telegraphed the commanding officer of Alexandria of the fact, and requested that the force at Washington be sent out as far as Bristoe, where I will connect with it by patrols from Cedar Run. I am sorry to say that the horses have suffered considerably for want of forage and from exposure to rain and wind. A few days, I hope, will bring them up again. The railroad is in good order up the Rappahannock railroad bridge and to Warrenton. The construction train is now at the bridge. Three trains have arrived with stores.

GEORGE STONEMAN,

Major-General, Commanding Cavalry.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

April 22, 1863.

Major-General STONEMAN,

Commanding Cavalry Corps, Warrenton Junction, Va.:

Your telegram of this date received. It is hoped the arrival of the trains has enabled you to replenish your supplies, both of subsistence and forage, and it is expected that you are again prepared for a forward movement, so far as regards your stores. The commanding